Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1992 Film)

Hello, hello!
For Spook-tober I thought it would be a fitting idea to finally check out Buffy the Vampire Slayer. I have never ever seen the show, so it’s about time. However, before we can get to the show, we need to take a closer look at the movie that came before!

The Plot (according to Rotten Tomatoes):

For Buffy Summers (Kristy Swanson), nothing is the same after she meets Merrick Jamison-Smythe (Donald Sutherland). Merrick tells the teen that he’s been sent to train her to fight vampires, and he proves himself by displaying his supernatural powers. Buffy is a quick study, and soon takes fellow student Oliver Pike (Luke Perry) under her wing, repeatedly saving him from fierce bloodsuckers. But, when a very dangerous vampire (Rutger Hauer) gets rambunctious, she must go to war again.

The Rating:

I am honestly at a loss for words. The show is has a pretty serious tone as far as I know, so I expected something similar from the movie. Well, its’s not. It’s probably one of the most ridiculous things I have ever seen and I’m not sure that was intentional. There are moments where the films seems a tad selfaware – you can’t tell me that anybody would keep some of the scenes on accident. But then again for some part it appears to be an attempt at a serious movie. So, I’m really not sure what to make of it. All I can say is that I had some laughs, but overall I didn’t love the flick.

The most interesting part of the movie was discovering all the faces that would later be very famous. I honestly don’t know how the film turned out this crappy with so many good actors and actresses: Hillary Swank, Donald Sutherland, Luke Perry, Kristy Swanson, David Arquette…

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Book vs. Movie: Ready Player One

Hello, my darling readers!
Today I have a special book vs. movie for you. I finally had time to check out Ready Player One, one of 2018’s biggest films and based on the 2011 New York Times bestseller by Ernest Cline!

The Plot:

It’s 2045. Life on earth sucks. That’s why most people spend every free minute they have in the OASIS, a virtual reality entertainment space. It was created by James Halliday who hid several easter eggs in the game. The person who manages to find all the easter eggs will inherit his fortune. The race begins when Wade Watts stumbles onto the first clue…

Book vs. Movie:

So, book first.
I didn’t really know what to expect when I plunged into this 80’s themed hell of a ride. Ernest Cline managed to come up with a book that’s both refreshingly unique and full of nostalgia.
His vision of the OASIS is fascinating but also a little disconcerting as it seems really plausible.
While I am too young to have experienced the 80’s I have a fondness for films like E.T. or Back to the Future. Shows like Stranger Things that bring back that vibe are right down my alley, so this book hit the perfect spot for me.

The Easter Eggs/riddles Cline came up with are smart and interesting. I learned a great deal about 80’s pop culture while reading this book! The hunt was fascinating and was rooting for our hero so hard. I couldn’t put the book because I wanted to know badly whether he would win or not.

Being a bit of a geek myself, you can tell how much fondness Cline has for this area and how much fun he had creating his nerd-utopia. Maybe that’s why I enjoyed his novel so much!

I already knew the film would be very different, as there was stuff you just can’t translate to the screen too well. Looking at the egg hunt, it was evident that there would be changes. However, I did not expect the film to be the way it turned out. For example, they changed one of the first tasks to a The Shining haunted house maze kind of thing. While I loved The Shining, it was released in 1980, so it’s not something I’d think of as representing the 80’s.

As is often the case with this kind of thing (see the first Percy Jackson movie) challenges have time to unfold in the book while in the adaptation things seem far too easy as otherwise, the film would be way too long or the audience would lose interest. I hate it when this happens especially because the riddles where so well-done in the book!

What was the biggest letdown with the film for me was the lack of retro-vibe. While the book gave me all the 80’s the movie didn’t strike me as particularly 80’s looking. Honestly, hadn’t I known that it’s set in that time I probably wouldn’t have noticed despite the many references going on. Of course, this has a great deal to do with obtaining rights, but it still irked me.

One thing I’ll grant the adaptation, however, is that it’s visually stunning. The OASIS looked impressive and the CGI-team really deserves some praise for that.

In general, the film seemed like one of the light flicks you might pick for a movie night where you don’t want to have to think about the movie too much. You’ll watch it, enjoy it, never think about it again.

The book is every nerd’s fantasy. It’s smart, it’s intriguing and you won’t be able to put it down. The film, on the other hand, was a bit a shallow letdown. I wouldn’t have missed much had I skipped the adaptation.

Did you prefer the book or the movie? Let me know in the comments!

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Book vs. Movie: The Umbrella Academy

Hey guys!
Today I want to talk about one of Netflix’ most anticipated and successful releases of 2019: The Umbrella Academy. Not only does the show give us a lot of material to take a look at, but I also checked out the comic book series it is based on.

The Plot:

After 43 women around the world give birth at the same moment in 1889 without being pregnant before, 7 of those babies are adopted by an eccentric billionaire. All of them exhibit certain powers that are not to be messed with.
In the present day the estranged sibling have to come together once more not just for their adoptive father’s funeral, but to save the world…

Comics vs. Series:

First things first. Let’s talk about the comics. I picked up The Apocalypse Suite which was the first Umbrella Academy comic series and Dallas, which was #2.
I usually don’t read comics as they are a super-fast read but rather expensive at the same time. However, The Umbrella Academy was available at my library so I was excited to give it a go.

What did I like? The artwork was beautifully done and the idea behind the story is both unusual and fascinating.
When it comes to the execution, however, I am not that thrilled. both comic books had rather confusing and irritating storylines. I’m still not sure I fully understood all that went down. Apart from the fact that the stories didn’t make all that much sense, they also lacked depth. I’m not sure if I had that feeling because I’m simply not used to reading comic books, but I had hoped for more. My favorite thing about both books was that in Dallas, #5 gets a dog (who is absolutely adorable). If that doesn’t tell you all about the stories…

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Book vs. Series: A Series of Unfortunate Events (Season 3)

Hey guys!
A Series of Unfortunate Events concluded on Netflix with its third and final season. The last four books in Lemony Snicket’s thirteen-part children’s novel series.

The Plot:

Trying to escape from their latest bit of trouble, the youngest Beaudelaire child gets kidnapped by Count Olaf. Klaus and Violet have to investigate VFD to save their sister, but what has a sugar bowl to do with all of that?

Book vs. Series:

Season 3 adapts four Lemony Snicket books: The Slippery Slope, The Grim Grotto, The Penultimate Peril and The End.
Although I enjoyed the book series, I was glad that it was over. We are talking about 13 books here, so I reached a point where I got a little sick of the whole story. Don’t get me wrong, the books were taking an interesting turn, and were just as smart and intricate as the other installments.

However, with these books, we reach a point where I desperately wanted to know how the riddle is to be solved. Well, what we get is more beating around the bush, more obscure moments.

Also, the end was not quite what I had expected or wanted from the series. To be fair, it was the end the book series need to have, so I can’t be pissed about that. I did in-depth reviews, for each book. So if you want more discussion on that front make sure to check those out!

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Book vs. Movie: Everything is Illuminated

Hello, my beloved readers!
Another day, another book vs. movie post. Today I want to talk about the rather weird novel Everything is Illuminated by Jonathan Safran Foer and its adaptation!

The Plot:

Jonathan, a young American, travels to Ukraine to find the woman who had saved his grandfather’s life during the Nazi invasion. He enlists the help of both Alex and his grandfather who run an agency specialized in that kind of thing. All of them end up finding more than they had bargained for…

Book vs. Movie:

Okay, I’ll kick it off with the novel. The special thing about this book is that it tells two stories. We have Jonathan who travels to Ukraine and cruises the countryside in search of his grandfather’s past. And then we have the story of Trochenbrod, the Jewish shtetl he is looking for.
For some reason, the book reminded me a lot of Nick Cave’s And the Ass saw the Angel. Not because the story is similar, but because both books gave off the same vibe.

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Book vs. Movie: Everything, Everything

Hello, my darling readers!
After a YA book adaptation with Nick Robinson yesterday, I thought we’d stick with him a little longer. Everything, Everything was published in 2015 and found its way to the screen in 2017. So let’s take a look!

The Plot:

Due to her immunodeficiency, 18-year-old Maddy is unable to leave her house. Up until now, she had made peace with her condition. That changes when Olly moves in next door and she suddenly longs for more…

Book vs. Movie:

Okay, let’s begin with the book. I know many people loved it to bits, however, I am not one of them.

It started out interesting enough, but I swear 25 pages in I knew exactly how the story would end. I kept hoping I wouldn’t be right. However, I had nailed it.

While Maddy is kind of likable, the story turns into such a cheesy love story that we’ve seen just like this a million times before. The plot-twist at the end felt forced and uninspired.

Many parts of the story were extremely unrealistic (Hawaii?!) or predictable. Everything, Everything left me bored and annoyed that I wasted my time with this. If you are going for cute with so much sugar on top it’ll give you diabetes + a bucket full of drama, this is the book for you. But if you expected something fresh, unique or surprising you will be disappointed.

Although I wasn’t fond of the novel, I decided to give the movie a shot. Maybe the story works better on screen?

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